Workshop Schedule

Friday, April 7th

Workshop 1 - Sessions from 5 p.m. to 5:50 p.m.

This is a basic primer on Sexual and Gender Minorities that covers some of the terminology which is commonly used, information about pronouns, and some tips about allyship.

In this workshop, the presenters will engage participants in a critical reflection on whiteness, power, and privilege and share stories of our personal experiences of "allyship" gone wrong.

Conversing with intersectionality and its critiques, this workshop engages with questions of inclusion and exclusion in feminist discourse. Does intersectionality address pre-identity or post-identity politics? How might differences be best recognized? Grappling with theory and activism, this workshop hopes to open up conversations on inclusionary strategies in feminisms.

As the number of applications from ethnically diverse students continue to rise, let's take a look into what diversity recruitment currently looks like at Appalachian State. Let's also explore what the future looks like and where we want to go. The current student body plays a huge role in the recruitment process. As we move forward, collaboration will be a key factor in continuing the growth of diversity on our campus. How can we work together to not just improve our recruitment practices but also the experience of diverse students populations on campus.

Sometimes religion gets reduced to a question about what happens after death. However, at times religious communities have contributed massively toward efforts aimed at equity in action, whereas at other times they have dreadfully undermined such efforts. We will discuss historical examples, share personal experiences, and imagine future possibilities concerning the intersections of religion with struggles for equity in action.

On April 1st, 2016, citizens of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe established a Spirit Camp on the proposed route of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) to protect water sources, land, and sacred sites from the $3.8 billion 1,172 mile oil pipeline that is set to run from the Bakken shale fields of North Dakota to Peoria, Illinois. Over two hundred Native Nations from the United States, Canada, and Latin America and many non-Native allies joined the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in the largest gathering of indigenous peoples in over a century.

Panelists will share stories from Standing Rock and explore the significance of the #NoDAPL movement as they situate the struggle in its historical and political context. Recognizing that Standing Rock is one of many frontlines, panelists will discuss the next steps in the global movement for indigenous sovereignty and resistance to harmful extractive industry.

The panel is co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, Department of Sustainable Development, Native American Student Association, Multicultural Center, Belk Library, and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Workshop 2 - Sessions from 6 p.m. to 6:50 p.m.

Womanism is a feminist movement described by Alice Walker (author of The Color Purple) that came from Black feminism. It focuses on community uplift, intersectionality and celebration of other women, specifically women of color. This presentation will critique the mainstream feminist movement throughout history as well as give suggestions on how to make it a more inclusive and intentional movement. No prior knowledge of feminism is required for this presentation, however please come prepared with an open mind and ready to discuss!

From books to television to video games and more, disability is becoming an identity that is getting more and more ground in media, but what are these representations like? This presentation will look at the portrayal of disability in the media, looking at examples of both high quality and low quality representations. We will cover topics like inspiration porn, 'abled-splaining', and disability stereotypes, as well as looking at when disabled characters are written by or acted by non-disabled people. These problems with media portrayals can in turn affect the stereotypes both disabled and non-disabled people internalize, causing problems with accessibility and ableism. People will hopefully leave this presentation having a new perspective on analyzing the media they consume and working to unlearn the messages and stereotypes of disability that are shown.

This presentation will explore the current status of masculinity and what this means for work in social justice, equity and inclusion. Topics will explore the social construction of masculinity and ways to address this appropriately across campus.

This presentation will explore how issues concerning the body are medicalized, how this aggrandizes the role of medical professionals in issues of social justice, and the implications of this for future social justice movements. Examples to be discussed include the medicalization of the bra, pregnancy and childbirth, fatness, and more. Collaboratively, attendees will consider paths to interrupt, subvert, and break medical models.

On April 1st, 2016, citizens of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe established a Spirit Camp on the proposed route of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) to protect water sources, land, and sacred sites from the $3.8 billion 1,172 mile oil pipeline that is set to run from the Bakken shale fields of North Dakota to Peoria, Illinois. Over two hundred Native Nations from the United States, Canada, and Latin America and many non-Native allies joined the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in the largest gathering of indigenous peoples in over a century. Panelists will share stories from Standing Rock and explore the significance of the #NoDAPL movement as they situate the struggle in its historical and political context. Recognizing that Standing Rock is one of many frontlines, panelists will discuss the next steps in the global movement for indigenous sovereignty and resistance to harmful extractive industry. The panel is co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, Department of Sustainable Development, Native American Student Association, Multicultural Center, Belk Library, and the College of Arts and Sciences.

Saturday, April 8th

Workshop 3 - Sessions from 10 a.m. to 10:50 a.m.

This presentation is an overview of disability theory and identity. It covers the social model of disability, the harmfulness of the medical model of disability, the ways that disabilities are part of identities, and how they intersect with other identities. The workshop also entails discussions of microaggressions, problems with access, and advocacy steps for temporarily able-bodied allies.

Ours is a culture of competing conversations: on any given day, we hear people argue that we live in a post-racial society, our news headlines include stories of racial violence, and students on campuses across our country challenge both ongoing racial climate concerns and the lack of appropriate institutional response. This workshop will help participants contextualize these conversations within our specific history of race relations, understand the ways racism operates (interpersonally, culturally, institutionally), and reflect on the ways to play a role in creating cultural change.

This workshop will centrally focus on the root causes of health, frequently referred to as upstream factors. The session will ultimately describe the relative importance of social injustice to health outcomes and involve interactive discussion/activities related to how we can effectively reduce health disparities facing our nation. Come prepared with your critical thinking hats on!

This presentation explores the supposed link between crime and punishment. We generally believe that these two social phenomenon are fundamentally related. But what if they are not, and never have been? What might punishment have been doing if it was never actually a response to crime? What if, as radical criminology has been arguing for sometime, variations in the form and severity of punishment, and specifically imprisonment, respond to the changing needs of local labor markets and not the levels of reported crime? How does this change our understanding of the phenomenon of hyper-incarceration, the rise in immigrant detention, and other forms of social punishment?

I will be discussing the process of creating community by serving nutritious food in a restaurant setting to all with emphasis on those "of less means." The purpose of the the presentation is to educate others about the "pay as you can model" and how it helps facilitate organic community.

I will be discussing the process of creating community by serving nutritious food in a restaurant setting to all with emphasis on those "of less means." The purpose of the the presentation is to educate others about the "pay as you can model" and how it helps facilitate organic community.

Workshop 4 - Sessions from 11 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.

KNOW THIS: Everything that the LGBTQIA community has is because of Trans Women of Color. This presentation will explore the ways in which queer and trans people of color (QTPOC) are erased in a community that values visibility and are forced in archetypes laced with racial bigotry.

Ours is a culture of competing conversations: on any given day, we hear people argue that we live in a post-racial society, our news headlines include stories of racial violence, and students on campuses across our country challenge both ongoing racial climate concerns and the lack of appropriate institutional response. This workshop will help participants contextualize these conversations within our specific history of race relations, understand the ways racism operates (interpersonally, culturally, institutionally), and reflect on the ways to play a role in creating cultural change.

This will be an interactive workshop takes a brief look at what is a diverse ability and how we can do our best to accommodate those individuals in our everyday lives and clubs and organizations through engaging presentation and case study analysis. We ask and answer the questions: What is accommodate? Who can we accommodate? How we can accommodate?

The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict is often a divisive subject which can make people uncomfortable and heated. This workshops aim is not to say which position is right or wrong but to teach participants how to make themselves feel heard and respected in discussions while also making the other side feel valid. Skills taught in this workshop can apply to not only the Israeli-Palestinian conflict but to other hot-button issues. Anyone wanting to learn how to better handle conflicting opinions may attend this workshop though it is recommended you have some prior knowledge of the Conflict.

Because of the surge in movement for black lives, a nationwide call has been made to recognize how anti-blackness has always and continues to permeate all facets of these United States. In this presentation, well delve into early histories of anti-blackness and see how that mirrors whats happening right now in our laws, policies, media and more.

What is self care?

  • Being a Social Justice advocate can be very draining.
  • Self care is IMPORTANT FOR EVERYONE!!
  • Exercise, time management, relaxing, doing things for YOU.
  • You cannot carry everyones burdens for them so you need to learn strategies to take care of yourself.

Workshop 5 - Sessions from 1 p.m. to 1:50 p.m.

The goal of this interactive workshop is learning how we can become better advocates for the LGBTQ+ community by creating brave spaces of dialogue where we grow to know ourselves and others. This workshop will cover the complexities of identity in the "alphabet soup" of gender and sexuality and offer support strategies for both allies and those who identify as LGBTQ+.

Drawing on Dr. Lyiscotts experiences facilitating community cultural circles with a blend of teachers, students, schloars, and community workers throughout NYC, this workshop models powerful strategies for moving from cultural analysis to collective social action. In this interactive workshop, participants will participate in a structured activity from Paulo Frieres work with oppressed populations in 195-s Brazil to critically analyze salient social issues toward the goal of individual and collective accountability.

This workshop is a two part examination and discussion of marginalized identities in media.

Get Out (2017) is a recently released and critically acclaimed movie. While the movie focuses on Black men, some of the most impactful stories and social commentaries can come from examining the three Black women who were not discussed. This first portion will focus on these stories and why they are so important.

Moonlight (2016) is a Golden Globe and Academy award winning independent film that focuses on homophobia in the Black community. The movie focuses on three stages in the life of a black man who is discovering his sexuality in a community that resents it.

 

The Model Minority Myth, or the stereotype that Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPI) are inherently successful and socially docile, is often referred to as a double-edged sword. This image of the "hardworking" contemporary AAPI is the result of complex historical context and conflict. This presentation will be an overview of the creation of The Model Minority Myth, some of its implications for AAPI, and a few of the ways it affects the AAPI community today.

There are many different types of service that focus on helping one's fellow man, and ultimately uplifting the community. Educational service is one of the most important types of service because it ensures the people doing work have a deeper understanding of what is actually happening in the area, and also administers a level of respect as they serve. This presentation will focus on the history of educational service, why it is important, and how to perform and get involved with educational service. While all service is important, we as a community must understand the goal for all service, is educational service.

There are many different types of service that focus on helping one's fellow man, and ultimately uplifting the community. Educational service is one of the most important types of service because it ensures the people doing work have a deeper understanding of what is actually happening in the area, and also administers a level of respect as they serve. This presentation will focus on the history of educational service, why it is important, and how to perform and get involved with educational service. While all service is important, we as a community must understand the goal for all service, is educational service.

Workshop 6 - Sessions from 2 p.m. to 2:50 p.m.

This presentation addresses the many ways in which Black Male patriarchy, masculinity, and misogynoir can combine to marginalize folks within the Black community. Utilizing data from previous and current research, as well as popular culture references, we will work to analyze the question: Is it REALLY just a man thing?

A brief history of feminism and other gender equity movements until present time, and then dialogue about how to move forward with a "most inclusive" gender equity movement. Idea that the discussion will center around:

  • How can we make feminism a more inclusive movement?
  • Is time for a different gender equity movement that is most inclusive, and what that could look like?
  • How can all current gender equity movements highlight and amplify other voices?

Cultural Appropriation and cultural appreciation or exchange can be a tricky area to navigate. This program will give the basics of cultural appropriation and how we can be more conscientious about the ways we consume culture all around us. From dress, to word choice, to artifacts and more; it's important to think twice before assuming a culture is for you. There will also be an opportunity for dialogue at the end of the presentation.

Modern American culture includes constantly changing language and vernacular often accredited to younger generations. Older words return and new words appear, but we often fail to think: Where does this vocabulary originate from? Does the phrase initiate bias towards specific identities while excluding others? Is the vernacular being misused? In this presentation, we analyze the origin, usage, and misusage of modern American "slang."

The marginalization and the continuous oppression of African Americans is still a pressing issue that has manifested into a new dimension.

An interactive simulation where participants explore how social identities impact experiences with privilege and discrimination in everyday situations.

Contact Us

    

Office of Multicultural Student Development

Address:
Suite 255, Plemmons Student Union
263 Locust Street
Boone, NC 28608

Central Office Hours:
M-F: 8am - 5pm

Phone: (828) 262-6158
Fax: (828) 262-6155

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